Have your say – a new national disability strategy | Life Without Barriers

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On 29 July 2020, Senator the Hon Anne Ruston, Minister for Families and Social Services, released the National Disability Strategy Position Paper.

The Minister for Families and Social Services has announced the commencement of Stage 2 consultations for the new National Disability Strategy (the new Strategy).

The Department of Social Services is still seeking people’s feedback on the Position Paper and invites all Australians – especially those with disability – to have their say by reading the Position Paper and providing a submission or answering the questions in the guided questionnaire.

Submissions will close on 31 October 2020.

Braille versions may be requested by:

  • Phone: 1800 334 505 (the phone will be answered Monday to Friday 8:30am to 5:00pm, outside of these hours please leave a message)

  • TTY: Phone 1800 555 677 and ask for 1800 334 505

You can have your say by providing a submission on the position paper.

Background

The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 (the current Strategy) is Australia’s overarching framework for disability reform and sets out a ten year national plan for improving the lives for Australians with disability, their families and carers. The current Strategy is about creating a more inclusive society that enables Australians with disability to fulfil their potential as equal citizens. It is also the main way Australia implements the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

The Australian Government is leading the development of a new the new Strategy for beyond 2020. Commonwealth, state, territory and local governments across Australia are working together in consultation with people with disability to develop the new Strategy.

Stage 1 Consultations

Last year 3,000 people with disability, their families and carers, advocacy organisations, peak bodies and service providers took part in Stage 1 consultation and community engagement.

Stage 1 consultations asked about:

  • the barriers people with disability face;

  • what has improved, and what has not; and

  • what is important for the next national disability strategy?

Stage 2 Consultations

The Department of Social Services is now undertaking the second stage of consultations on the new Strategy and are asking for your feedback on governments’ proposals for the next Strategy, as set out in the National Disability Strategy position paper. The proposals include:

  • the vision, outcome areas and guiding principles for the new Strategy

  • a stronger focus on improving community attitudes

  • clearly describing roles and responsibilities of governments and the community

  • regular public reporting that shows whether the key outcomes for people with disability are improving

  • developing targeted action plans to drive better implementation

  • how people with disability can be engaged in the delivery and monitoring of the next Strategy.

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