The National Disability Insurance Scheme and HCWA: FAQs – Shuffler News – Shuffler News

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What is the NDIS?

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a single, national scheme that funds reasonable and necessary support to help Australians with disability, including children with disability or developmental delay, reach goals throughout life.

If your child has a significant and permanent disability or developmental delay, the NDIS supports your child and the people who care for your child. The NDIS can help you get existing services and support within your community, as well as funding for early intervention therapies and supports or one-off items like wheelchairs.

The NDIS is run by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA).

What will happen to HCWA?

Funding for early childhood intervention services and treatment provided under the Helping Children with Autism (HCWA) program has now closed to new children. Funding has moved to the NDIS. Other resources like HCWA Medicare items will stay the same.

If you have a child getting support from HCWA, you should receive some information and paperwork from the NDIA.

You can also ask for this information by:

  • calling the NDIA on 1800 800 110
  • going to an NDIA office.

You must complete the paperwork and return it as soon as possible to make sure your child’s move to the NDIS happens smoothly.

How do I get NDIS support for my child?

There are two main pathways to NDIS support – one is for children under seven years, and the other is for children seven years and older.

On both pathways, an NDIS representative will arrange to meet and talk with you about your child’s and family’s needs. They’ll help you make an NDIS access request if this is what you need.

What is the NDIS pathway for children under seven years?

If your child is aged up to seven years, you’ll meet with an NDIS early childhood partner.

In this meeting, you’ll discuss your child’s needs and goals.

You’ll talk about the support your child currently gets from family, friends or service providers and how well this support works for your child. And you’ll talk about general things like how your child usually manages daily activities, and more specific topics like how much support you think your child needs for certain tasks.

This might take more than one meeting, and a specialist might need to assess your child.

Your early childhood partner will work with you to decide on the supports your child and family need. Depending on your child’s needs, the early childhood partner might:

  • give you information or emotional support
  • connect you and your child with supports in your area, like community health services, playgroups or peer support groups
  • provide short-term early intervention therapies and supports for your child.

If your child needs longer-term support, your early childhood partner can:

  • recommend that your child quickly moves to an NDIS plan
  • help you make an access request.

If your child becomes an NDIS participant, your early childhood partner will work with you to develop an NDIS plan that supports your child’s needs and goals.

Once your child’s NDIS plan is approved, your early childhood partner will explain your child’s plan and support budgets and help you make contact with service providers.

What is the NDIS pathway for children seven years and older?

To get NDIS support, children aged seven years and older must have a permanent and significant disability that affects their ability to take part in everyday activities.

If your child is aged seven years or older you’ll meet with an NDIA planner or an NDIS local area coordinator (LAC).

You’ll talk about your child’s needs and goals. You’ll also talk about the support your child gets from family, friends, mainstream providers (like the education system) and community activities or service providers. And you’ll talk about how well this support works for your child.

You’ll also talk about general things like how your child usually manages daily activities, and more specific topics like how much support you think your child needs for certain tasks.

This might take more than one meeting, and a specialist might need to assess your child.

You and your NDIS representative will work together to develop an NDIS plan for your child. The plan will then be given to the NDIA for approval.

What is an NDIS plan?

An NDIS plan is a written agreement between you and your child and the NDIS. It describes the:

  • supports and services in your child’s life
  • goals you want your child to achieve
  • funding that has been allocated in your child’s plan.

You keep using the programs and services funded by HCWA until you have an approved NDIS plan for your child. When the NDIS plan is ready, it replaces HCWA funding.

What if my child can’t access the NDIS?

If your child gets support from Helping Children with Autism (HCWA) but doesn’t meet the requirements to access the NDIS, the Australian Government Department of Social Services will continue to manage this funding until 31 March 2021, until your funds are spent, or until your child reaches the maximum age for the scheme, whichever happens first.

Your child might be able to get support that isn’t funded by the NDIS. This includes supports that your child can get from other community and government services.

Will my child be worse or better off under the NDIS?

With the NDIS, your child will get support that gives them at least the same outcomes that they get with Helping Children with Autism (HCWA) support.

This doesn’t mean that your child will get exactly the same types or level of services or resources as they get with HCWA.

The NDIA will consider your child’s specific needs as well as the types and level of support your child is getting with HCWA.

Can we use our existing service providers?

Once your child’s NDIS plan is approved, you can usually keep using your child’s existing service providers if you’re happy with them and they meet your child’s needs and goals.

Your choice of service providers is determined partly by the options you choose for managing your child’s plan.

The NDIA is encouraging service providers to register with the NDIS so that people get continuity through the transition to the NDIS. You can find local providers registered with the NDIS.

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#NDIS #shufflernews #NDISSoletrader
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Another NDIS Sole Trader Initiative

Unfunded, unsponsored and UNREAL

This post was originally published on this site NDIS News Feed Rss.app https://rss.app/feeds/a9qJtTN0lY5uESwx.xml

#NDIS #shufflernews #NDISSoletrader

www.shufflernews.com

Another NDIS Sole Trader Initiative

Unfunded, unsponsored and UNREAL

NDIS News Feed Rss.app https://rss.app/feeds/a9qJtTN0lY5uESwx.xml

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